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Quick copy

Missouri S&T Quick copy offers both digital color and black and white copies from electronic and paper originals. A variety of paper stock as well as finishing services are available to provide quality documents to meet your needs.
Staff are available during the hours of 8:00 AM to noon and 12:30 PM to 4:30 PM M-F in G-8 Campus Support Facility to consult with you on your quick copy needs in person or by phone at 341-4264.



Services:

  1. Color and Black and White copies

  2. Folding: examples include letter, single, fan, french, etc

  3. Stapling

  4. Binding: examples include plastic and wire spiral, perfect, etc.

  5. Lamination

  6. Sales of thesis and other types of paper

  7. Digital Imaging - Scanning of paper documents to PDF electronic ones for posting to web or archival purposes. See Scanning

  8. Printed photos from digital camera memory cards or electronic files

  9. CD duplication

  10. Fax service

How to submit jobs
Quick copy jobs may be submitted by:

  1. Sending an electronic file attached to an email note addressed to: mstprint@mst.edu (available 24 hours a day

  2. Mailing the original, printed document to Quick Copy, G-8 Campus Support Facility

  3. Bringing the original, printed document to G-8 Campus Support Facility during business hours

Notes: Although the color and b/w copies produced on the digital copiers from hardcopy originals are of excellent quality, those produced from electronic originals are typically superior due to the direct process that avoids scanning an original.

Information needed for production and billing will be collected at the time of job submittal.

Billing
Charges made to University accounts are billed out on a monthly basis.
Quick Copy also makes cash sales for those that do not have University accounts.

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